Common Misconceptions About Beer

When you think of beer, you may have all of these ‘facts’ listed in your brain that come up to list off to your friends. But are all of your facts really true? We have a list of Common Misconceptions About Beer, that will have all of your friends wanting to hear more and believing that you’re a beer enthusiast. 

Beer is Simple

Now, this just isn’t true! There is a lot that comes into play in the brewing process, including the steps, ingredients, and final creation of the product. When the brewery creates the idea of their beer, they decide what types of hops they’re going to use, what flavors they want to incorporate, the type of malt they’re going to use, and even the amount of yeast! 

There’s more than just the color that comes with brewing a refreshing beer. They’ll decide if they’ll be incorporating real ingredients, such as coffee beans, or even notes of different types of fruits! There are several different types of hops to choose from too, because there isn’t just one sole hop that goes into every beer, which can be Hallertau, Apollo, Chinook, and so many more! And don’t get us started on the different types of malt they could use!

Beer is Meant to be Ice Cold

Another myth that is very common to hear. Your beer is actually going to be tasteless if you serve it too cold. Don’t you want to taste your beer? According to Business Insider, “Serving temperature varies by style…Pilsners and IPAs are usually served around 40-44° F, while heavier styles are usually served around 55° F.” 

How do you serve or drink your beer? Are you tasting the true potential of your favorite brew? 

Beer and the Beer Belly

Of course, we’ve all heard this one before! Remember, anything in excess and filled with calories will contribute to weight gain, but as MentalFloss writes, “beer is hardly the most calorie-laden drink you’ll find in a bar. Much of the flack beer gets goes back to the fallacy that beer is heavy.” 

Different beers and their respective styles will be different in calories, and that includes the amount of sugar that goes into each brew’s list of ingredients. This just illustrates that you shouldn’t believe everything you hear, without doing the proper research.

Now that you’ve figured out the real facts, we’ve got you covered with your favorite brews, you can find all of them with our locator here: bsyl.ink/locator

The Difference Between Ales and Lagers

The first step in learning about beer is to understand the difference between ales and lagers. Ales and lagers are the two main classifications of the beer family. Ales are considered traditional brews, that are generally more robust as they are rarely filtered while Lagers are usually heavily filtered with much cleaner presentations due to the cold lagering period. The difference has nothing to do with the alcohol content or the color. It all begins with the brewing process.

Yeast

Ales are made with top-fermented yeast. The yeast doesn’t ferment at the top of the tank. It typically rises to the top near the end of fermentation. Ale yeast often produces esters that can impact the flavor of the beer.

Lagering is the process of cold storage, which is widely believed to be how lager yeast came to be and become so prevalent. Lagers slowly came around in the 15th century and became famous in the German and Northern continental regions, before spreading across the world. Lagers are made with bottom-fermented yeast, which is due to the yeast collecting at the bottom of the tank to ferment, they can be reused.

There are some exceptions to the rules as some brewers do use bottom-fermented yeast to make Ales.

Fermentation Temperature

Ales are fermented warm while lagers are fermented cold. Most ales ferment at the 60-75° range with some strains of yeast requiring temperatures as high as 95-100°.  Due to these temperatures, ale yeast tends to ferment faster than lagers. Lagers ferment at temperatures between 46-59°.

Due to the variety of yeast used in beers, these temperatures may vary slightly. Even more so if hybrid strains of yeast are used.

Flavor

Ales are generally more robust, fruity, aromatic, complex in taste and aroma. This is due to ales having a higher amount of hops and malt. Lagers are light-tasting, generally higher in carbonation, smooth, mellow and balanced.

Ultimately, there are great ales and lagers. One style is not better than the other. It’s a matter of personal preference. If you’re interested in trying a pale ale and lager, we recommend Grey Sail Captain’s Daughter, Revival Night Swim’ah and Wormtown’s Be Hoppy!