Father’s Day Gift Ideas

It’s almost time to celebrate an important man in your life, a true superhero, your father! Father’s Day is just around the corner and we have the perfect gift ideas for you! We’re ‘beery’ excited to share them with you.

#1 Choose Your State Beer Cap Trap

We know that you’re reading this blog because your Dad is definitely a fan of his beer. Well, why let those bottle caps go to waste? Represent his favorite state while also letting him showcase his favorite beers. Place the bottlecaps right in the slots and pick the shape/state you’re looking for! Only $34.95 and we’re sure your Dad will love it!

#2 Beer Shaped Cookies

While he might be expecting a nice cold beer, surprise him with a few cookies to go along with it! Make his favorite cookie recipe and shape them into beer mugs! Just grab some yellow, black and white food coloring and frosting, and start painting on the cookie! We all know what a full beer mug looks like, right?

#3 “Beer” Cake

We know this might sound like an actual cake, but it’s not. Grab a few of his favorite beers by using our locator and stack them in three tiers using a circle shaped piece of cardboard to hold each level! Wrap a few of his favorite snacks in between and what you think he’ll like and voila you have his “Beer” Cake!

#4 Handmade Card

Even though we might not all be very creative, there’s nothing wrong with making a handmade card. Find some funny “Beer” and Father’s Day related puns to write on the card! It’ll be sure to make him laugh and something made just from you, will warm his heart. (Ex: “Hoppy Father’s Day!”)

We hope you enjoyed these ‘Crafty’ tips and gifts to treat your Dad this Father’s Day! Let us know in the comments below, which gift ideas you’ll be trying out!

Bell’s Brewery Partnership

We’re proud to announce our latest partnership with… Bell’s Brewery! We were one of the eleven distributors chosen to help them bring their famous brews to New England!

Laura Bell, CEO of Bell’s Brewery says, “As we add any new state, it is very important to us that we remind all of our fans about our dedication to quality. Part of the process of selecting new distributor partners is making sure that is a shared passion.”

“We are all very excited to welcome each of these distributors to our extended Bell’s family and look forward to launching New England and New Jersey with partners who share our commitment to craft beer and quality,” she added.

We’re thrilled to be able to bring Bell’s beers to our area! Stay tuned for more information by following us on all of our social media platforms to keep you up to date.

Learn more about Bell’s Brewery at www.bellsbeer.com

History of St. Patrick’s Day

When you hear or see the date March 17th, we’re sure your mind immediately goes to St. Patrick’s Day just like ours does!

St. Patrick’s Day is an observance of St. Patrick’s death and is treated as a religious holiday for the Irish. Many celebrate this holiday, even those who don’t have any Irish ancestry. It’s a time of revelry for many and an excuse to drink and celebrate all day.

And did you know, according to History.com “More than 100 St. Patrick’s Day parades are held across the United States; New York City and Boston are home to the largest celebrations.

Even though you may not have Irish ancestry, you’re still welcomed to enjoy and celebrate the popular holiday. Just remember to drink responsibly, in moderation and to never drink and drive.

To truly enjoy the fun celebration that is St. Patrick’s Day, here are some ales we recommend!

Lough Gill Brewing Co., an Irish independent brewery in Sligo, Ireland and their Imperial Oatmeal Coffee Stout.  As well as their Mac Nutty and ‘Round the Clock. Another perfect ale for this holiday is Wachusett Brewing Company Quinn’s, a smooth amber ale named in honor of their founding brewer and favorite Irish-American Peter Quinn.

Which will you choose to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day?

Outer Light Brewing Company Partnership

McLaughlin & Moran is proud to announce our newest partnership with Outer Light Brewing Company!

Outer Light is a craft brewery based in Groton, CT. founded by Tom Drejer and Matt Ferrucci. They opened their doors to the public in 2015 and have made their mark in the local brewing scene by offering a core and rotating lineup of expertly crafted small batch craft beers.

They capture the beautifully simple pleasures of life: a perfect summer afternoon, a crisp autumn evening shared with family and friends around a crackling campfire and more in a can, glass or growler.

Dave Plummer, our Brand Manager of McLaughlin & Moran states, “Outer Light Brewing has already created a buzz in the craft beer community. Craft beer drinkers are looking for quality and consistency, which Outer Light Brewing brings to the table with their year-round beers and an impressive collection of innovative experimental styles.”

Curious about the styles we’ll be distributing? There will be four year-round offerings: Lonesome Boatman Amber Ale, Libation Propaganda Coffee Stout, Subduction IPA, and Cloudbreak Double IPA. They will be available in cans at liquor stores and on draft at bars and restaurants throughout Rhode Island.

Select seasonal and experimental beers will become available in the summer of 2018.

Learn more about the Outer Light Brewing company here: http://www.outerlightbrewing.com/

5 Amazing Health Benefits of Beer

 

We always hear about the amazing health benefits of wine, but what about beer? Here are five amazing health benefits of beer you may not have known.

Improves Cholesterol

A 2016 study by the American Heart Association revealed moderate consumption of beer slowly decreased cholesterol over time. You may think drinking more would increase those results, but the same study revealed that heavy drinking eliminated this benefit.

Improves Memory

Beer contains vitamin B12, which is essential in maintaining healthy brain cells, concentration, and memory.

Boost Problem-Solving Skills

A study published in the Consciousness and Cognition journal revealed that participants with a blood alcohol level of 0.07 or higher solved 40 percent more problems and took less time to complete than their sober counterparts.

The findings found that participants were in a more flexible mental state which allowed them to be more creative to solve problems compared to those who were sober.

Reduces the Risk of Kidney Stones

Beer acts as a diuretic and increases urination. An increase in urination helps remove toxins and other materials from the body that can result in kidney stones.

Aids in Digestion

Beer is a great source of fiber. It has more fiber than wine which makes it a better option.

Beer may have great health benefits, this does not mean you should increase your alcohol consumption. Remember to always drink beer and other alcoholic beverages in moderation. Do Not Drink and Drive.

A History of Anheuser-Busch

Anheuser-Busch’s roots date back to the mid-1800s when many German immigrants came to St. Louis, due to political upheavals in Germany and Bohemia in 1848. With the huge migration of Germans to St. Louis, the main industry in the area soon became brewing. These immigrant brewers presented a new style of beer to the United States: Lager. Lighter, crisper and tougher to brew, Lager beer requires more time and care than other styles of beer. In a short time, Budweiser would go from a local favorite to the king of beers around the globe.

Eberhard Anheuser Meets Adolphus Busch

Eberhard Anheuser, who left Germany in 1843, qualified as a soap manufacturer, eventually going on to own the biggest soap and candle corporation in St. Louis. Although he had no brewing knowledge, he became part owner of the Bavarian Brewery, which had first opened its doors in 1852. By 1860, Anheuser had purchased the other investors and the brewery’s name was altered to E. Anheuser & Co.

Adolphus Busch was born in 1839, the second youngest of twenty-two children. At age eighteen, he made his way to St. Louis via New Orleans and the Mississippi River. Adolphus began working as a counter clerk on the riverfront and by the time he was twenty-one, he had a partnership in a brewing supply business. It was through this enterprise that Adolphus Busch met Eberhard Anheuser, and soon Adolphus was presented to Eberhard’s daughter, Lilly. In 1861, Adolphus Busch and Lilly Anheuser were married, and shortly after that, Adolphus went to work for his father-in-law. He later accepted half ownership in the brewery, becoming a partner. By the mid-1800s, there were more than fifty breweries in the St. Louis area. At that point, most beer in the United States was sold in the community in which it was brewed. Adolphus was determined to make a brand that would exceed the tradition of local brews and please the tastes of a variety of different people. In 1876, he and his friend, Carl Conrad, created an American-style Lager beer that exceeded everyone’s expectations. Adolphus invented the label “Budweiser,” a name that would appeal to German immigrants like himself, yet could be effortlessly pronounced by Americans. Budweiser was a hit and eventually became the company’s flagship brand.

Early Innovations

In the early 1870s, Adolphus Busch became the first American brewer to use pasteurization, which made it possible to ship beer long distances without decaying. By the mid-1870s and early 1880s, he presented artificial refrigeration, refrigerated railcars and rail-side ice houses. These technological innovations allowed the company to grow and distribute beer across the country. Budweiser was the first national beer brand, announced in 1876. To market his beers, Busch used traditional, proven selling methods but in a far more organized and deliberate manner than his opponents. He pioneered the use of gifts and premiums, and used his brewery as a showplace for the public to visit.

In addition to being innovative in the technical development of the brewing industry, Adolphus Busch was an expert at advertising and promoting his brands. In 1879, the company was renamed the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association to recognize Adolphus’ labors. The following year, upon the death of Eberhard Anheuser, Adolphus became president of the brewery. In 1901, the company broke the one- million barrels of beer sales mark for the first time, making it one of the nation’s leading breweries. Adolphus Busch passed away in 1913 and was succeeded by his son, August A. Busch, Sr., who became president of the brewery in 1913.

Surviving Prohibition

The brewery’s bleakest period began at midnight on Jan. 16, 1920, when national Prohibition became law. Rather than close its doors, as more than half of the nation’s breweries did, Anheuser-Busch expanded and remained in business. Under the leadership of August Sr., the company marketed more than twenty-five different non-alcohol goods such as soft drinks, truck bodies and ice cream. To prepare for the Prohibition, Anheuser-Busch released Bevo, a non-alcoholic cereal beverage, in 1916. On April 7, 1933, beer was legalized again.

Recovery from Prohibition was slow but steady under Adolphus Busch III, who became president of the company in 1934, upon the death of his father, August Sr. Economic conditions caused by the Great Depression also restrained growth, but, thanks in part to the introduction of the metal can in 1936, sales began to increase. By 1938, Anheuser-Busch hit the two-million-barrel mark. During World War II, the company diverted a lot of its operations in support of the war effort, voluntarily relinquishing its West Coast markets to conserve railcar space for war materials shipments.

An Era of Growth

Following World War II, both America and Anheuser-Busch experienced an era of progress and prosperity throughout the 1950s and 1960s. In 1946, August A. Busch, Jr. became president of the company following the death of his brother, Adolphus III. Beginning with the opening of the Newark, N.J. facility in 1951, August Jr. created a national network of nine breweries.

Because of his leadership, beer sales increased from three million barrels to more than thirty-four million barrels, and corporate diversification was prolonged to include family entertainment, industrial products, real estate and can manufacturing. In 1957, Anheuser-Busch became the leading U.S. brewer, a position it still holds today.

August A. Busch III was elected president of Anheuser-Busch, Inc. in 1974, and the next year succeeded his father, August Jr., as chief executive officer, becoming the fourth generation of the family to lead Anheuser-Busch. August III ran the company to build four additional breweries and expand and diversify operations. In 1982, the company created Bud Light nationally, which progressed quickly in popularity and today is one of the world’s best-selling beer brands. In 2008, Anheuser-Busch and InBev joined to become Anheuser-Busch InBev. The new corporation is the world’s largest brewer and one of the top five consumer goods companies in the world. Now, Anheuser-Busch continues to satisfy diverse tastes by marketing more than one hundred varieties of beer and alcohol beverages.

Brewery Spotlight: Lough Gill Brewery

Located in beautiful Sligo, Ireland, with many sites to behold, Lough Gill Brewery is the first brewery to be located in Sligo in over 100 years since Foley’s Brewery ceased brewing on the site of what is today the Velvet Rooms building. This brewery strives to think outside the box and brew unique and complex high-quality specialty brews never seen before.

Their mission is to brew interesting, tasty handcrafted beers using the best ingredients available to them and also some unique indigenous ingredients. Their team takes pride in creating these unique, wonderful and adventurous handcrafted beers.

They’ve surpassed their mission of creating interesting beers, with unique flavors and the ability to create dark and mysterious brews. One of their beers is titled Mac Nutty. “Some would say we’ve gone nuts – but taking our time over each and every step is part of what makes every one of our craft brews unique”. This beer exhibits a rich nutty flavor and luxurious dark brown color. Brewed with real macadamia nuts toasted in their own kitchen along with top quality malts and hops.

For those who love to try new and unique beers, with some traditional ingredients, Lough Gill Brewery’s beers are the perfect choice.

Learn more about Lough Gill Brewery here: loughgillbrewery.com and use our locator today to try out their unique flavors, ‘Round the Clock, Mac Nutty, and Imperial Oatmeal Coffee Cream Stout.

What’s the Difference Between Beer and Cider?

Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages around the world, but cider, a staple in Britain, is growing in popularity in the states. Most cider and beer lovers have a hard time differentiating between the two. Here are a couple of differences you should be knowledgeable of.

Ingredients

Beer is made from malted barley while cider is made from fermented apple juice. There are several beers that contain fruit and other ingredients, but the core is always malted barley. No true cider contains malted grains.

Color

Beer comes in a variety of colors from pale to very dark depending on the malt. Ciders are often yellow, orange or brown. Ciders may also vary in cloudiness and sediment due to the fermentation process and filtering.

Sugar Content

The amount of sugar in beer compared to cider is the biggest difference. Beer contains a larger amount of complex sugars post fermentation which aids in balancing bitterness and rounds out the mouthfeel. Beer and Cider both can have sugar added to it in order to dry it out or even to increase the sweetness. Sugar is not used post fermentation to sweeten beer while with cider it can be used pre or post filtering to balance the acidity or mouthfeel. Cider contains a higher quantity of sugar and varies per brand. Dry ciders allow the yeast to feed on the natural sugars to create a less sweet and higher alcohol content. As well as the difference in fermentation, beer is boiled while cider is more often than not, not boiled.

Health Benefits

The fruit juice in ciders contain antioxidants including polyphenols. According to one study, these antioxidants have been linked to protecting against certain types of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Naturally occurring polyphenols are present in hops and malts, but brewers often remove it during the beer-making process because it makes the beer cloudy. In a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health, beer does contain flavonoids (a type of polyphenol compound) that may be good for your heart.

Alcohol Content

Beer and cider have a similar alcohol content, but in America cider can be alcoholic as well as non-alcoholic. In most English speaking countries, cider is synonymous with alcoholic apple fermented products and apple juice encapsulates all of the other varieties of non-alcoholic apple beverages. Beer always contains alcohol.

These differences don’t make one better than the other. Some may say people who aren’t beer drinkers should start off with ciders and work their way to beer. Regardless of preference, there are a variety of ciders and beers to choose from. If you would like to taste the difference between a cider and beer, try McKenzie’s Hard Cider and Stella Artois Cidre.

The Difference Between Ales and Lagers

The first step in learning about beer is to understand the difference between ales and lagers. Ales and lagers are the two main classifications of the beer family. Ales are considered traditional brews, that are generally more robust as they are rarely filtered while Lagers are usually heavily filtered with much cleaner presentations due to the cold lagering period. The difference has nothing to do with the alcohol content or the color. It all begins with the brewing process.

Yeast

Ales are made with top-fermented yeast. The yeast doesn’t ferment at the top of the tank. It typically rises to the top near the end of fermentation. Ale yeast often produces esters that can impact the flavor of the beer.

Lagering is the process of cold storage, which is widely believed to be how lager yeast came to be and become so prevalent. Lagers slowly came around in the 15th century and became famous in the German and Northern continental regions, before spreading across the world. Lagers are made with bottom-fermented yeast, which is due to the yeast collecting at the bottom of the tank to ferment, they can be reused.

There are some exceptions to the rules as some brewers do use bottom-fermented yeast to make Ales.

Fermentation Temperature

Ales are fermented warm while lagers are fermented cold. Most ales ferment at the 60-75° range with some strains of yeast requiring temperatures as high as 95-100°.  Due to these temperatures, ale yeast tends to ferment faster than lagers. Lagers ferment at temperatures between 46-59°.

Due to the variety of yeast used in beers, these temperatures may vary slightly. Even more so if hybrid strains of yeast are used.

Flavor

Ales are generally more robust, fruity, aromatic, complex in taste and aroma. This is due to ales having a higher amount of hops and malt. Lagers are light-tasting, generally higher in carbonation, smooth, mellow and balanced.

Ultimately, there are great ales and lagers. One style is not better than the other. It’s a matter of personal preference. If you’re interested in trying a pale ale and lager, we recommend Grey Sail Captain’s Daughter, Revival Night Swim’ah and Wormtown’s Be Hoppy!

Common Myths About Beer

There are several common misconceptions about beer, but you shouldn’t believe everything you hear. There’s no doubt you’ve heard about these myths, so let us shine some light on the truth.

Myth: Beer is Best Served Ice Cold

We’ve all seen the commercials advertising drinking beer ice cold or serving the beverage in a frosted mug, but this causes beer to lose its aromatics. Beer served at near frozen temperatures blinds the taste experience because your tastebuds will be more shocked by the frigid temperature of the liquid. Beer is typically dispensed between 38°- 42°. Some more flavorful beers may be served at warmer temperatures to ensure maximum flavor.  

Myth: Drinking Too Much Beer Results in a Beer Belly

We aren’t sure where this saying came from, but it is false. You’re more likely to get a large belly due to consuming unhealthy food and a lack of exercise. Yes, beer has calories, but not as much as a triple cheeseburger, fries, and a milkshake. Enjoying a beer now and again won’t give you a beer belly. Moderation is key.

Myth: Beer Kills Brain Cells

When a person consumes too many beers, they experience slurred speech, lack of physical balance, forgetfulness, and other symptoms. So, what’s going on? High levels of alcohol can interrupt the signals being sent to your brain, but it doesn’t kill your brain cells. According to the American Journal of Epidemiology, participants did not experience a decrease in brain cells or cognitive behavior. Nonetheless, it is not proposed that these findings be used to encourage increased alcohol consumption.

Myth: Canned Beer Tastes Cheap

Don’t judge a beer by its can. Canned beer doesn’t indicate the quality of a beer. This idea may stem from a personal preference similar to people assuming a wine bottle with a screwed top is automatically a lower quality than one with a cork.

The best way to preserve beer is to prevent oxygen and light from penetrating the beer. The most effective way to do that is to store it in a can. Oxygen can seep into the tops of beer bottles and dark glass bottles may not always block light. If you don’t want to drink beer from a can, pour it into a glass.

Myth: Dark Beers Have More Alcohol Than Light Beers

Many people think the darker the beer, the more bitter or stronger it will be. Guinness is automatically assumed to have a higher alcohol content due to its color, but it only has 4.2 percent compared to Bud Light Platinum’s six percent.

Regardless of your preference for bottled, canned, light, or dark, enjoy your beverage at the correct temperature and drink in moderation this holiday season.